Russian Grand Priory - Timeline.


1698

Czar Peter the Great, Emperor of Russia had sent a delegation to Malta under Field Marshal Boyard Boris Petrovitch Sheremeteff.

1766-1769

under Empress Catherine II the Great Russian Naval Officers were trained at Malta.

1775

The Polish Priory had been formed as part of the German Langue.

1782

Catherine's son, Grand Duke Paul visited De Rohan in Malta.

1782

The conversion of the English Langue into the Anglo-Bavarian Langue with the formation of the Grand Priory of Ebensburg in Bavaria, created from the revenues of the suppressed Jesuit Order in Bavaria.

1783

18th July King George III of England consents to the creation of the Anglo-Bavarian Langue.

1789

Bailiff Count Giulio Renato de Litta who had been involved in the organisation of the Baltic Fleet took up service at St Petersburg and became involved in the war against Sweden.

1785

Polish Priory transferred to the Anglo-Bavarian Langue.

1793

Land owned by the Polish Priory was part of the territory partitioned by Russia.

1797

4/15th January Convention between The Order and Paul I, converting the Polish Priory into a Russian Grand Priory.

1797

7th August; The Sacred Council approved of the Convention

1797

17/28th November; additional articles appended to the Convention.

1797

29th November/10th December, The inauguration of the Grand Priory of Russia (Catholic).

1798

1st June; The Treaty drawn up between the Order and Paul I to create "a new Foundation" of the Order of Malta...."for the Nobility of the Greek Religion"

1798

June 11th Through Napolean's Invasion, Malta signed over to the French.

1798

26th August, Hompesch deposed by the Order in Russia.

1798

27th October/7th November, Paul I elected as Grand Master which he accepted on the 13th November/24th November.

1798

29th November/10th December, Emperor Paul I, investiture as Grand Master & Proclamation of the Emperor Paul I creating 98 Commanderies for Russian Nobles. Bailiff Count Giulio Renato de Litta appointed as Lieutenant Grand Master.

1798/1799

Ukase issued 28th December 1798/8th January 1799 terms the new foundation for Russian Nobles as the "Russian Grand Priory", and the previous Catholic Grand Priory as the "Russian Catholic Grand Priory".

1799

14th March, Russian Court informed of papal disapproval for the Election of Paul I as Grand Master.

1799

17th March, de Litta replaced as Lieutenant Grand Master by Field Marshal General Bailiff Count Nicholas Soltikoff.

1799

26th June Emperor Paul I had added by Ukase, a further 20 Commanderies to the 98.

1799

6th July Grand Master Hompesch abdicates bringing the schism in the Order to an end.

1799

21st July/1st August 1799 Ukase 19.044 issued governing the Family Commanderies.

1799

23rd October The Translation of the relics into Russia.

1799

The Order consists of four Langues, The Russian Langue, for the Italian and Latin Langue, the French Langue, the Allemande (German) Langue.

1800

5th September; British take possession of Malta.

1801

22nd March, Paul I murdered.

1802

27th March The Treaty of Amiens was finalised allowing the restoration of Malta to the Order, but preventing any resurrected, English and French Langues.

1803

9th February Giovanni Battista Tommasi di Cortona appointed Grand Master. Restoring a Roman Catholic Grand Master. Convent located at Messina.

1804

In February 1804 the Convent is moved to Catania.

1805

12th May 1805 Hompesch died at a Convent in Montpellier.

1805

13th June, Tommasi died. Innico-Maria Guevara-Suardo is appointed as Lieutenant GM.

1805

17th June, Bailiff Giuseppe Caracciolo di Sant Eramo elected as GM. Election rejected by the Pope Pius VII.

1807

21st October the Pope confirmed Guevara-Suardo to remain as the Lieutenant Grand Master finally rejecting Caracciolo.

1809

10th February the Russian Grand Priories recognise Guevara-Suardo as Lieutenant Grand Master withdrawing their previous support from Caracciolo.

1810

26th Feb (OS) Ukase issued removes income from both Russian Grand Priories, but funds continued activities.

1811

20th Nov (OS) Ukase allows the property of Family Commanderies of the Order, to be redeemed by the Family Commanders as personal property or become State properties.

1817

Russian Citizen refused permission to wear the Decoration of the Roman Catholic Order of Malta - known as the Lazareff Judgement.

1825

Nicholas I restores the two Chapels of the Order in Worontoff Palace.

1826

In May 1826 the Convent of the Order is moved to Ferrara.

1834

In 1834 the Convent is moved to the Palazzo Malta on the Via Condotti, in Rome.

1848

Nicholas Loumer (Belgium) publishes a book on Knighthood which states the two Russian Priories existed.

1858

Sir Bernard Burke issued a book on Knighthood which states the two Russian Priories existed - probaly relying on Loumer's research.

1889

Permission to Prince A V Troubletzkoy to wear the Decoration of the Russian Grand Priory in 1867 is renewed under Alexander II.

1912

Count Vladimir Armfeldt a member of the Russian Grand Priory receives permission to wear his decoration.

1917/18

Russian Revolution brings all activities of the Russian Grand Priory to an end.

1919

Relics of the Order taken to Copenhagen to Villa of Empress (mother of Nicholas II)

1928

June 24th Re-establishment of the activities of the Russian Grand Priory.

1928

Relics of the Order bequeathed by Empress to Prinncess Yelena of Yugoslavia (sister to the King) and placed in the Royal Palace in Belgrade.

1932

Paris Group seek rapprochment with the Roman Catholic Order - refused on the ground the members are not all Roman catholic.

1939

Creation of the Priory of Dacia (in Denmark) by members of the 1928 Paris group as a sub-Priory of the Russian Grand Priory. Not fully established until after the War allowed normallised communications.

1941

Transfer of the Relics of the Order to Ostrog Monastery for safe keeping.

1945

Transfer of the Relics of the Order to Museum at Cetinje.

1955

15th Feb Russian Grand Priory incorporated under French Law.


Amended 18th November 2004.

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